Relocating to New Orleans Guide Tips Advice and Real Estate

Relocating to New Orleans ?

NOLA is the festival capital of the world, New Orleans is a melting pot of culture, food, and music. The city portrays a melange of cultures and traditions with spicy food, pulsating music and bars that don’t have a closing time.

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The early European settlers like the French, galvanized the intermingling of cultures – Africans, both slave and free, and American Indians with the Europeans which resulted in a durable culture that gave New Orleans its distinct character.

New Orleans Relocation Tips RyanRogers@kw.com

There is generally a slow pace of life in the city described best by the phrase “New Orleans time”. Long late nights and lazy summer afternoons is what life in the city is about. If you have any intentions of moving to this city, you have got to slow down and embrace life here.

New Orleans Climate
The city is a peninsula forming a crescent-shaped curve around the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain on the north. New Orleans is located in the delta area on the natural levees along the Mississippi River. Mild winters, and hot and humid summers characterize the city’s climate.

The waterfronts keep the climate away from the extremes. Rain falls throughout the year with maximum precipitation in the summer and minimum or nonexistent precipitation in October. In the winter, the precipitation is usually due to the passing cold front.


relocating-to-new-orleans-guide-tips-advice-and-real-estate

New Orleans is known for being unlike any other city in the US, both culturally and aesthetically. With its heavy French influences, it has a far less ‘structured’ appearance than some US cities, giving it a great character. Lively and exciting, the city has a fantastic buzz and a relaxed, laid-back atmosphere, making it a great city to settle in.

On moving to New Orleans, expats may find the city is very easy to navigate on foot, and there are also some excellent transportation links to get around town. Expats living in the city will also get the chance to experience its famous Streetcars, which were featured in the Tennessee Williams play A Streetcar Named Desire. Thanks to its mostly flat land, it is also an excellent city for cycling.

New Orleans is famous internationally for its likeable, welcoming and friendly people, who go out of their way to help. There is a great sense of community in the city and residents are more than happy to help newcomers settle in – ask them about their city and for directions and you’re sure to get an enthusiastic and welcoming response.

New Orleans is described as having a ‘humid subtropical’ climate involving mild winters, which are relatively short, and particularly hot and humid summer periods. Temperatures can dip over the winter months, although instances of snow and freezing temperatures are rare, with the lowest ever recorded temperature being 6°F (-14°C), way back in 1899. While the summers bring with them the warmest months, they also tend to bring the wettest weather, and the driest days of the year tend to occur during the fall, particularly in October.




One thing that concerns expats moving to New Orleans is the threat of hurricanes, especially after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. It is worth noting, however, that incidents of severe hurricanes are extremely rare, and it is their sensationalism and prevalence in the international media that makes them appear more common than they truly are. Today, the city’s hurricane defenses are better than ever.

Overall, those living in New Orleans can enjoy a warm climate throughout the year, making it a great choice for expats wishing to enjoy a pleasant climate.

Getting to New Orleans
With a number of excellent transport routes, it is not only easy to get around New Orleans itself, but also to travel to other neighboring cities in Louisiana, nearby states, and international destinations.

Louisiana is a relatively small state, especially in comparison to its neighbor, Texas. This means that traveling around the state is easy by bus, car and rail, providing plenty of opportunities for expats moving to New Orleans to explore other parts of Louisiana. Many major roads pass through Louisiana and New Orleans, including the US 61 (which begins in Minnesota and ends in the city), providing a clear cut path to the north of the country. The US 90 (which begins in nearby Florida) also passes through the city, while the US 11 connects New Orleans all the way to the US-Canada border.

New Orleans is home to its own airport; the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport provides travel from the city to a number of destinations, including New York, Los Angeles, Washington, Miami, Cancun in Mexico, Toronto in Canada, and Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic.

New Orleans Relocation Tips RyanRogers@kw.com

Rail travel is provided by Amtrak and lines go to places such as New York City, Chicago, Orlando and Los Angeles; it is therefore possible to travel to both coasts of the US easily by rail, with many journeys crossing the Mississippi River.

Snowfall is sporadic and occurs rarely during Christmas which is usually a combination of rain, sleet, and snow. Coastal erosion and human interference have made New Orleans more susceptible to hurricanes. Post- Katrina, the United States Army Corps of Engineers have taken massive hurricane protection measures like repairing levees to protect the city from any more flooding.
New Orleans Neighborhoods
The Quarter, commonly called the French Quarter or Vieux Carre, is considered a National Historic Landmark and one of the oldest neighborhoods in the city. The Central Business District is analogous to downtown of many other cities. The neighborhood consists of skyscrapers housing various professional offices, retail, restaurants, clubs, and restored commercial and industrial buildings which have turned into residences. Central City has more of an African American population and plays an important role in the city’s brass band and Mardi Gras.

Great Local Information = http://www.neworleansonline.com/

Audubon, also known as the University District, houses Tulane and Loyola Universities and has the largest park in the city, the Audubon Park. Once a marsh and a fishing town for Uptowners, Broadmoor is an area that has witnessed substantial growth in recent times. Treme is one of the oldest neighborhoods and is known for African American and Creole cultures. The West End is a recreational boating hub also known for its seafood restaurants. The Bywater neighborhood has seen no flooding which has earned it the name “silver by the river”. This is the neighborhood where the Society of Saint Anne marching Krewe starts their procession during Mardi Gras.

The city offers an affordable cost of living as compared to other major metros. USA Today rated New Orleans as the number one city for gas savings with an average commute of 13.7 miles each day. Louisiana has been ranked the number one happiest state in the US in a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009.

Sales tax in New Orleans is 9 percent and it is not levied on food and medications. The city is a shopper’s paradise for international shoppers as there is a refund of sales tax for international shoppers at any of the tax-free stores. Whether you want a mansion, boat house, or a cottage in the swamps, the New Orleans housing scene is highly versatile.


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New Orleans Relocation Tips RyanRogers@kw.com

  • Make a checklist of tasks to be done before and after you’ve moved. Carry a hard copy of these two with you always.
  • It is a good idea to give your foreman not just your phone number but also your alternate contact number, in case you can’t be reached on the former.
  • Pack a box with bare necessities like toiletries, toilet paper, flashlight, screw driver, paper plates, cups, a couple of utensils, paper towels and other such items. Ask your foreman to load this box last so that it will be unloaded first at your destination.
  • Unscrew bulbs from the lamps before packing them. Lamp shades need additional protection so it is a good idea to pack them separately.
  • Irreplaceable photos, financial papers, legal documents like wills, passports, family medical records, and valuables (jewelry, stamp and coin collections) should be moved by you.

Take a final walk-through of the house and switch off all of the utilities like electric, gas, and telephone.Helpful Links:

  • New Orleans City Government Website:
    Everything you need to know about all of the current goings-on within the city government of New Orleans, as well as moving resources for people moving to the city.
  • Louisiana OMV:
    Here you’ll find information on how to register your car in the state of Louisiana if you’re moving from out of state, and also how to renew your driver’s license, change your address, and get a new Louisiana driver’s license.
  • Entergy Electric:
    Entergy Electric provides the city of New Orleans with electric services, so this website will be where you can sign up for new service when you move to New Orleans.
  • New Orleans Public Works and Utilities:
    The New Orleans Public Works and Utilities Department handles all of the water and sewer, waste collection, and recycling needs for the population of New Orleans.

New Orleans is known for being unlike any other city in the US, both culturally and aesthetically. With its heavy French influences, it has a far less ‘structured’ appearance than some US cities, giving it a great character. Lively and exciting, the city has a fantastic buzz and a relaxed, laid-back atmosphere, making it a great city to settle in.

On moving to New Orleans, expats may find the city is very easy to navigate on foot, and there are also some excellent transportation links to get around town. Expats living in the city will also get the chance to experience its famous Streetcars, which were featured in the Tennessee Williams play A Streetcar Named Desire. Thanks to its mostly flat land, it is also an excellent city for cycling.

New Orleans is famous internationally for its likeable, welcoming and friendly people, who go out of their way to help. There is a great sense of community in the city and residents are more than happy to help newcomers settle in – ask them about their city and for directions and you’re sure to get an enthusiastic and welcoming response.

New Orleans is described as having a ‘humid subtropical’ climate involving mild winters, which are relatively short, and particularly hot and humid summer periods. Temperatures can dip over the winter months, although instances of snow and freezing temperatures are rare, with the lowest ever recorded temperature being 6°F (-14°C), way back in 1899. While the summers bring with them the warmest months, they also tend to bring the wettest weather, and the driest days of the year tend to occur during the fall, particularly in October.

One thing that concerns expats moving to New Orleans is the threat of hurricanes, especially after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. It is worth noting, however, that incidents of severe hurricanes are extremely rare, and it is their sensationalism and prevalence in the international media that makes them appear more common than they truly are. Today, the city’s hurricane defenses are better than ever.

Overall, those living in New Orleans can enjoy a warm climate throughout the year, making it a great choice for expats wishing to enjoy a pleasant climate.





Getting to New Orleans
With a number of excellent transport routes, it is not only easy to get around New Orleans itself, but also to travel to other neighboring cities in Louisiana, nearby states, and international destinations.

Louisiana is a relatively small state, especially in comparison to its neighbor, Texas. This means that traveling around the state is easy by bus, car and rail, providing plenty of opportunities for expats moving to New Orleans to explore other parts of Louisiana. Many major roads pass through Louisiana and New Orleans, including the US 61 (which begins in Minnesota and ends in the city), providing a clear cut path to the north of the country. The US 90 (which begins in nearby Florida) also passes through the city, while the US 11 connects New Orleans all the way to the US-Canada border.

New Orleans is home to its own airport; the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport provides travel from the city to a number of destinations, including New York, Los Angeles, Washington, Miami, Cancun in Mexico, Toronto in Canada, and Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic.

Rail travel is provided by Amtrak and lines go to places such as New York City, Chicago, Orlando and Los Angeles; it is therefore possible to travel to both coasts of the US easily by rail, with many journeys crossing the Mississippi River.

Relocating to New Orleans Guide Tips Advice and Real Estate

So maybe you found the perfect house, and you are ready to make a offer to buy it………….

TIP = You always should get a real agent to represent you and your best interest when buy a home. When people go to a court of law, with a judge , they never share a lawyer. There is always two lawyers. It just is not a good idea to share one real estate agent. It just does not work !

When a real estate agent is listing a home for sale, for a seller, their job is to market the property they are selling and maximize the sellers sale price !!!


Any questions, please email me and I would be glad to help,

RyanRogers@kw.com

Last, here is a great website that ranks the best places of New Orleans every year !

http://www.whereyat.com/best-of-the-big-easy